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Overview
Achilles TendonitisAchilles tendinitis is an uncomfortable condition where a person?s large tendon in the back of their ankle becomes irritated and inflamed. It is a very common type of injury, most often seen in recreational athletes. This makes sense because recreational athletes still play hard at their sports, but don?t have the full knowledge or training that comes with being a professional to prevent injuries. Achilles tendon pain is not something to be taken lightly, so if you are aware of your own, you should definitely seek some medical advice.

Causes
Although a specific incident of overstretching can cause an Achilles tendon disorder, these injuries typically result from a gradually progressive overload of the Achilles tendon or its attachment to bone. The cause of this chronic overload is usually a combination of factors that can put excess stress on the tendon: being overweight, having a tight calf muscle, standing or walking for a long period of time, wearing excessively stiff or flat footwear, or engaging in significant sports activity.

Symptoms
A symptom is something the patient feels and reports, while a sign is something other people, such as a doctor, detect. For example, pain is a symptom, while a rash is a sign. The most typical symptom of Achilles tendinitis is a gradual buildup of pain that deteriorates with time. With Achilles tendinitis, the Achilles tendon may feel sore a few centimeters above where it meets the heel bone. Other possible signs and symptoms of Achilles tendinitis are, the Achilles tendon feels sore a few centimeters above where it meets the heel bone, lower leg feels stiff or lower leg feels slow and weak. Slight pain in the back of the leg that appears after running or exercising, and worsens, pain in the Achilles tendon that occurs while running or a couple of hours afterwards. Greater pain experienced when running fast (such as sprinting), for a long time (such as cross country), or even when climbing stairs. The Achilles tendon swells or forms a bump or the Achilles tendon creaks when touched or moved. Please note that these symptoms, and others similar can occur in other conditions, so for an accurate diagnosis, the patient would need to visit their doctor.

Diagnosis
On examination, an inflamed or partially torn Achilles tendon is tender when squeezed between the fingers. Complete tears are differentiated by sudden, severe pain and inability to walk on the extremity. A palpable defect along the course of the tendon. A positive Thompson test (while the patient lies prone on the examination table, the examiner squeezes the calf muscle; this maneuver by the examiner How does Achilles tendonitis occur? not cause the normally expected plantar flexion of the foot).

Nonsurgical Treatment
Most of the time, treatment for achilles tendinitis beginning with nonsurgical options. Your CFO physician may recommend rest, ice, ibuprofen, and physical therapy. If after 6 months, the pain does not improve, surgical treatment may be necessary. The type of surgery would depend on the exact location of the tendinitis and extent of damage.

Achilles Tendon
Surgical Treatment
If non-surgical treatment fails to cure the condition then surgery can be considered. This is more likely to be the case if the pain has been present for six months or more. The nature of the surgery depends if you have insertional, or non-insertional disease. In non-insertional tendonosis the damaged tendon is thinned and cleaned. The damage is then repaired. If there is extensive damage one of the tendons which moves your big toe (the flexor hallucis longus) may be used to reinforce the damaged Achilles tendon. In insertional tendonosis there is often rubbing of the tendon by a prominent part of the heel bone. This bone is removed. In removing the bone the attachment of the tendon to the bone may be weakened. In these cases the attachment of the tendon to the bone may need to be reinforced with sutures and bone anchors.

Prevention
You can take measures to reduce your risk of developing Achilles Tendinitis. This includes, Increasing your activity level gradually, choosing your shoes carefully, daily stretching and doing exercises to strengthen your calf muscles. As well, applying a small amount ZAX?s Original Heelspur Cream onto your Achilles tendon before and after exercise.



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:: برچسب ها : How do you treat a sore Achilles tendon? , What do you do for Achilles tendonitis? , How does Achilles tendonitis occur? ,
تاريخ : چهارشنبه 12 مهر 1396 | 14:56 | نویسنده : Karine Fish |
Overview
As many as 14% of people have an ?accessory? or extra bone or piece of cartilage on the inner side of the foot. An accessory navicular is an inborn condition that affects only a minority of the population. It What is leg length discrepancy? not part of normal bone structure and therefore is not present in most people. It may be found when the foot is x-rayed for other reasons, or when irritation develops. Patients may not be aware of it until a change in their activity, growth spurt or new footwear creates friction. Most cases of accessory navicular syndrome are treated conservatively.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes
It is commonly believed that the posterior tibial tendon loses its vector of pull to heighten the arch. As the posterior muscle contracts, the tendon is no longer pulling straight up on the navicular but must course around the prominence of bone and first pull medially before pulling upward. In addition, the enlarged bones may irritate and damage the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon, making it less functional. Therefore, the presence of the accessory navicular bone does contribute to posterior tibial dysfunction.

Symptoms
A visible bony lump on the inner part of the foot, towards the middle, just above the arch of the foot. Redness, swelling, and sensitivity of the bony prominence. Pain or throbbing in the middle of the foot and the arch. Difficulty with foot movement and activity. Possible skin callous or skin irritation caused by footwear rubbing over the lump. Not everyone who has an accessory navicular will develop these problems. When problems do occur, they may begin in early adolescence. The obvious indication is a painful bump on the inside of the foot, which hurts to touch, and causes problems that gradually become worse, and which are aggravated by activity, walking, etc., leading to all the problems discussed here. Pain may be worse towards the end of the day, and continue into the night.

Diagnosis
An initial assessment is an orthopaedic office begins with a thorough history and complete physical exam, including an assessment of the posterior tibial tendon and areas of tenderness. Associated misalignments of the ankle and foot should be noted. Finally, weight-bearing x-rays of the foot will help in making the diagnosis. Sometimes, an MRI may be needed to see if the posterior tibial tendon is involved with the symptoms or getting more clarity on the anatomy of the accessory navicular.

Non Surgical Treatment
Most doctors will try to find a non-surgical approach to the issue due to costs and complications involved in a surgery. Some non-surgical procedures are: Immobilization which consists of placing the foot in a cast or walking boot to allow rest and decrease inflammation, placing a towel-covered-icepack on the area to reduce inflammation, anti-inflammatory or steroid drugs/injections may be prescribed to reduce swelling and pain, physical therapy may be used to help strengthen muscles and prevent a reoccurrence of symptoms, Orthotic Devices placed in the shoe to help support the arch and prevent a reoccurrence of symptoms.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
Depending upon the severity the non operative or conservative treatment should be maintained for at least 4- 6 months before any surgical intervention. There are 2 surgeries that can be performed depending upon the condition and symptoms. First is simple surgical excision. In this generally the accessory navicular along with its prominence is removed. In this procedure, skin incision is made dorsally to the prominence of accessory navicular. Bone is removed to the point where the medial foot has no bony prominence over the navicular, between the head of the talus and first cuneiform. Symptoms are relieved in 90% of cases. Second is Kindler procedure. In this the ossicle and navicular prominence is excised as in simple excision but along with the posterior tibial tendon advancement. Posterior tibial tendon is split and advanced along the medial side of foot to provide support to longitudinal arch. After surgery 4 week short leg cast, well moulded into the arch with the foot plantigrade is applied. Partial weight bearing till the 8th week and later full weight bearing is allowed. When the cast is being removed can start building up the ROM to counter atrophy and other physical therapy treatment which include stretching and strengthening exercises.

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:: موضوعات مرتبط :

:: برچسب ها : How long does Achilles tendonitis last for? , How do you get taller? , What causes burning pain in Achilles tendon? ,
تاريخ : چهارشنبه 12 مهر 1396 | 12:31 | نویسنده : Karine Fish |